item2

Sign up for a free Environmental Storytelling E-newsletter

item2e

Cooperation Stories 1

The Heaviest Burden (adapted from Indonesia)

Keywords: cooperation, teamwork, nature knows best, tree

Summary: Every part of a tree is complaining about how much work it does. The roots, trunk, branches and leaves all complain that they lievs are hard. The fruit argues that while its life seems easy, it has to get eaten. Finally the tree realizes that each part has a job to do.

"The Heaviest Burden," on page 93 in Jill Brand, The Green Umbrella: Stories, Songs, Poems and Starting Points for Environmental Assemblies (London: A & C Black, 1991). 106pp. $17.95pa. ISBN 0-7136-3390-5pa.

You can find a similar tales involving a house in "Those Who Quarreled," on page 82 in Elizabeth Hough Sechrist, Once in the First Times: Folktales from the Philippines (Philadelphia: Macrae Smith Company, 1949). 215pp.

Find another version in Kevin Strauss, Tales with Tails: storytelling the wonders of the natural world. (Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited, 2006). 230pp. $35.00pa. ISBN 1-59158-269-5pa.

 

A Bundle of Sticks (Aesop)

Keywords: cooperation, teamwork, farmer, sons

Summary: Once there was a farmer who had five sons who were constantly quarreling. Finally he had enough. He told them to go into the woods and bring back two sticks. He asked each son to break a stick with his hands. Each broke a stick. “That is how you are on your own,” said the farmer. Then he took the five leftover sticks and tied them together in a bundle. “This is how you are together.” The sons each tried to break the bundle, but the bundle of sticks were too strong.

Handford, S. A. Aesop's Fables (New York: Puffin, 1994). 212pp. ISBN 0-14-130929-6.

Zipes, Jack ed., Aesop's Fables (New York: Signet Classic, 1992). 288pp. ISBN 0-451-52565-5pa.

 

Lion and the Three Bulls (Aesop)

Keywords: cooperation, teamwork, lion, bull

Summary: Three bulls were once the best of friends and grazed together in the center of a field. Lion watched from the forest and knew that he couldn’t attach one of them if the others were there to help him. So during the night, he began whispering to each Bull about what the others were saying about him. Soon the Bulls began to believe the lies and grew angry with each other. They began feeding alone at the edges of the field. Once the bulls were on their own, Lion could kill them one by one and had quite a feast.

Handford, S. A. Aesop's Fables (New York: Puffin, 1994). 212pp. ISBN 0-14-130929-6.

Zipes, Jack ed., Aesop's Fables (New York: Signet Classic, 1992). 288pp. ISBN 0-451-52565-5pa.

Contact Us:

Environmental Storytelling Institute

info@environmentalstorytelling.com

Phone: (218) 365-5221

Address: P.O. Box 655, Ely, MN 55731

Portions of this website were made possible with a grant from the National Storytelling Network. www.storynet.org

(c) 2006 Tales with Tails Storytelling Programs

item2c item2b item2a item2 item2e1 item2e